Bahraini School Principals’ Perceptions of Giftedness and Gifted Education practices

Osama Almahdi, Abduyah Binte Yaakub, Abdelbaky Abouzeid

Abstract


Research on giftedness and gifted education has a rich history. Researches have consistently pointed to the educational leadership perspectives on giftedness, inequitable identification of policies and practices in gifted education. Research suggests there is a widening gap in the level of comprehensive knowledge in gifted education that are critical for school improvement. This paper examines school principals’ (n = 29) perceptions regarding giftedness among Bahraini students. The findings of the quantitative analysis of the research questionnaire indicate some dissonance between what constitute as giftedness and how the multi-criteria identification system applied. This study also explores the educational provisions school principals used to support gifted students in schools. Results provided along with the implications and future directions for further research discussion.

Research on giftedness and gifted education has a rich history. Researches have consistently pointed to the educational leadership perspectives on giftedness, inequitable identification of policies and practices in gifted education. Research suggests there is a widening gap in the level of comprehensive knowledge in gifted education that are critical for school improvement. This paper examines school principals’ (n = 29) perceptions regarding giftedness among Bahraini students. The findings of the quantitative analysis of the research questionnaire indicate some dissonance between what constitute as giftedness and how the multi-criteria identification system applied. This study also explores the educational provisions school principals used to support gifted students in schools. Results provided along with the implications and future directions for further research discussion.


Keywords


Education; Giftedness; School Leadership; Perceptions; Talents and creativity

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DOI: http://doi.org/10.11591/ijere.v10i2.21176
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